scienceyoucanlove
dichotomized:

Man in the electric chair at Ohio State Penitentiary, 1901 - Ohio, the second state to adopt electrocution, was proud of its humane choice of execution and issued souvenir cards of the procedure. In this image, a condemned man is strapped into the chair with the executioner standing at the switches, ready to pull the levers. With the passage of time and some mishaps, each execution technique was advanced, as minor flaws were corrected. Some very early executions had the hands of the condemned in a bucket of water. In its final form, the person is usually shaved and strapped to the chair with belts across his chest, groin, legs, head, and arms (some prisons place a strap over the mouth and nose and use a blindfold); a metal skullcap-shaped electrode is attached to the scalp and forehead over a sponge moistened with saline; and an additional electrode is moistened with conductive jelly and attached to a portion of the prisoner’s leg that has been shaved to reduce resistance to electricity. This creates a closed circuit. After the condemned is prepared, the warden may again read the death sentence, then he signals the executioner to pull a lever, sending a 15 to 30 second jolt between 1,000 and 2,000 volts into the condemned. The current surges and is then turned off, at which time the body relaxes and the doctors check to see if the inmate’s heart is still beating; intermittent jolts of electricity are given until the heart stops. The problem most viewers have found with electrocution isthe tremendous effect visual on the body: the prisoner is often fried in the process. At the end of the procedure, the body temperature can reach over 140 degrees. The audience reacts poorly to blistering skin and bursting, boiling blood vessels. United States Supreme Court Justice William Brennan offered the following description of an execution by the electric chair:

“… the prisoner’s eyeballs sometimes pop out and rest on [his] cheeks. The prisoner often defecates, urinates, and vomits blood and drool. The body turns bright red as its temperature rises, and the prisoner’s flesh swells and his skin stretches to the point of breaking. Sometimes the prisoner catches fire… Witnesses hear a loud and sustained sound like bacon frying, and the sickly sweet smell of burning flesh permeates the chamber.”

dichotomized:

Man in the electric chair at Ohio State Penitentiary, 1901 - Ohio, the second state to adopt electrocution, was proud of its humane choice of execution and issued souvenir cards of the procedure. In this image, a condemned man is strapped into the chair with the executioner standing at the switches, ready to pull the levers. With the passage of time and some mishaps, each execution technique was advanced, as minor flaws were corrected. Some very early executions had the hands of the condemned in a bucket of water. In its final form, the person is usually shaved and strapped to the chair with belts across his chest, groin, legs, head, and arms (some prisons place a strap over the mouth and nose and use a blindfold); a metal skullcap-shaped electrode is attached to the scalp and forehead over a sponge moistened with saline; and an additional electrode is moistened with conductive jelly and attached to a portion of the prisoner’s leg that has been shaved to reduce resistance to electricity. This creates a closed circuit. After the condemned is prepared, the warden may again read the death sentence, then he signals the executioner to pull a lever, sending a 15 to 30 second jolt between 1,000 and 2,000 volts into the condemned. The current surges and is then turned off, at which time the body relaxes and the doctors check to see if the inmate’s heart is still beating; intermittent jolts of electricity are given until the heart stops. The problem most viewers have found with electrocution isthe tremendous effect visual on the body: the prisoner is often fried in the process. At the end of the procedure, the body temperature can reach over 140 degrees. The audience reacts poorly to blistering skin and bursting, boiling blood vessels. United States Supreme Court Justice William Brennan offered the following description of an execution by the electric chair:

“… the prisoner’s eyeballs sometimes pop out and rest on [his] cheeks. The prisoner often defecates, urinates, and vomits blood and drool. The body turns bright red as its temperature rises, and the prisoner’s flesh swells and his skin stretches to the point of breaking. Sometimes the prisoner catches fire… Witnesses hear a loud and sustained sound like bacon frying, and the sickly sweet smell of burning flesh permeates the chamber.”